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Generations Magazine
Host Your Next Evemt

Entertainment

Lawrenceville Arts Center

125 N Clayton St, Lawrenceville, GA 30046

https://www.cdcclpac.com

With the opening of the new Lawrenceville Arts Center, what was already a busy schedule for the Aurora Theatre has gone into overdrive. The award-winning local theatre, which is the anchor for the new arts center seems to have something going on every single day. Coming up this week, the Aurora welcomes Atlanta’s Latin Jazz Orchestra.

“Club Babalù returns,” the Aurora’s director of sales and marketing Al Stilo stated. “Join us for a magical night of music and dancing on a starlit spring evening in the intimate Lawrenceville Arts Center Courtyard. Teatro Aurora welcomes Atlanta Latin Jazz Orchestra, a big band that lives to create music in the Latin jazz style.”

Founded in 2016, and led by Rob Opitz, the group includes top players and returns May 5, after a sold-out Lawrenceville Arts Center debut last year. “This Cinco de Mayo, help us turn downtown Lawrenceville into a dance party,” Stilo stated.

The Aurora presents Swindlers May 19 through June 5. Written by Chris Anthony Ferrer, the play is described as a “hilarious new farce that centers around bungling burglars, Jerry and Miles, who are set to make easy pickings of a millionaire Miami mansion. Things become complicated as the situation turns wildly hysterical in a circus of window breaking, code name using, bear skin rug scaring, people killing events that reveal a chance for these small-time crooks to make the biggest score of all time. The madcap caper? Finding the $300 million diamond first and getting out alive.”

In addition, the Aurora’s Season 27 tickets are now on sale for a line up that begins with Mary Poppins on the Clyde & Sandra Strickland Grand Stage this summer. The show opens in August and Stilo said season ticket holders get the best seats at the lowest cost with “priceless perks that are exclusive to our season ticket holders.” Mary Poppins kicks off the theatre’s 27th season Aug. 18, and will run through Sept. 11.

AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE NEW LAWRENCEVILLE ARTS CENTER'S PEACH STATE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION GRAND LOBBY. PHOTO CREDIT RION RIZZO

“We have a treasure here in the heart of Gwinnett,” Stilo said.

“The City of Lawrenceville armed with tremendous vision for how the arts will drive economic development and community building have invested in a facility that is now one of the county’s top arts facilities. Audiences will love all the amenities of the expanded campus.

“Just to name a few, we have a dedicated drop-off lane and curb cut; lots of great seating in the lobby area and the bar now serves draft beer. One of the biggest accomplishments is the quality of sound, the science behind the acoustics of the Clyde & Sandra Strickland Grand Stage was developed to make it the perfect place to attend a live musical production for the listener.”

Stilo said for those who need a little extra help, top assistedlistening devices are offered and patrons can request them at the box office on the night of any performance.

For a full schedule of upcoming events, dates, times, camps, classes and ticket information, visit www.auroratheatre.com.

Aurora productions and events are scheduled for young and old alike and several of them offer a great opportunity for grandparents and grandchildren to attend together. The Aurora Children’s Playhouse presents Circus Fantasea, May 7. Captain Tater Tot, the pirate ringmaster loses all his circus cargo in a mighty storm at sea and as the “Tide” rolls in, the performance promises waves of laughter, especially watching Octavius, the tap-dancing octopus. This aquatic adventure features puppets made from recycled and repurposed plastic bottles.

Coming up May 14, is another event grandparents might like to take their grandchildren to as the Aurora Children’s Playhouse presents Rhythm in Motion. Guests experience the pulsating sounds of Sunu, ceremonial music played by the Malinke people of Guinea and Mali during traditional festivals. This performance transports the audience to the villages of West Africa, where popular American dances, such as the Charleston and hip-hop moves were born. Founded in 1990, Manga African Dance has preserved, presented and taught indigenous African cultural arts through dance, drums, fashion, drama, songs and crafts.

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